Posted in Longer Posts, Reading, Tags and Lists, Words

End of Year Book Tag 2021

I’ve managed to fit in one last post before 2022.

It feels like I just finished putting together the Mid-Year Book Freak-Out Tag.


Are there any books you started this year that you need to finish?

I’m currently reading Dear Evan Hansen: The Novel by Val Emmich as well as the original writers of the Broadway musical. So far, it isn’t nearly as good.

Do you have a book or autumnal book to transition into the end of the year?

Boring answer, but no. I can’t even think of one I read recently by chance. My end-of-year reading was quite haphazard.

Is there a new release you’re still waiting for?

Here’s to Us, the sequel to the wonderful rom-com What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera, was released the day before yesterday. I can’t wait to read it, but I worry that a continuation of a lighthearted romance will feel unnecessary.

What are three books you want to read before the end of the year?

There are hundreds and I won’t get to any of them before the end of the year. To make it more interesting, here are three that aren’t on The Ultimate Reading List and that I haven’t mentioned on Words on Key at all.

Hell Followed With Us by Andrew Joseph White: Technically I can’t read this book before the end of the year since it doesn’t come out until June of 2022, but I’m looking forward to it.

She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan: The first sentence alone about this book on Goodreads is more than enough to make me read it. “Mulan meets The Song of Achilles in Shelley Parker-Chan’s She Who Became the Sun, a bold, queer, and lyrical reimagining of the rise of the founding emperor of the Ming Dynasty from an amazing new voice in literary fantasy.”

It had better not disappoint me.

The Extraordinaries by TJ Klune: After reading The House in the Cerulean Sea (review coming soon), which is sadly a standalone, I need more from TJ Klune.

Is there a book you think could still shock you and become your favorite book of the year?

By now, no. But I finished The House in the Cerulean Sea yesterday, and it blew me away. I won’t give all the details here because that’s what the upcoming book review is for, but it was better than I could have hoped.

Have you already started making reading plans for 2022?

As I’ve made clear, I’m not short on books to read. I’ll keep making my way through The Ultimate Reading List, ignoring the fact that it would take me around ten years to complete at the rate I’m going.

I also have a school competition, the same one I read Front Desk, Indian No More, and Gregor the Overlander for in past years, as well as Dragon Hoops this year. The ones I have left are Horrid by Katrina Leno, Furia by Yamile Saied Méndez, Early Departures by Justin A. Reynolds, and Punching the Air by Ibi Zoboi and Yusef Salaam.

As for book posts, I might make some book tags and lists for my own enjoyment, not in an attempt to make them spread around. I may take inspiration from the types of reading experiments that blogs like Adventures of a Bibliophile do.


Although I started Words on Key in 2020, days after everything closed in my area, and celebrated one year with it, I didn’t start reading and doing book reviews much until six months ago. As nerdy as it is, I do enjoy writing them and finding new favorite (and least favorite) books. I hope to find time to continue posting regularly in 2022 and beyond. Best wishes for the new year!


You might also like: Mid-Year Book Freak-Out Tag 2021

Author:

A teenager obsessed with words of all kinds. When I’m not reading or writing, I like drawing, musical theatre, and D&D.

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